Tag Archives: comedy

I just posted a long article updating my alien space wonder wanderings on this site’s sister site fmpoetry, including more on the Mesopotamian Apkallu featured on this site before. Along the way I found this artist’s interpretation of how ancient humans used to gYgPOP (greenY[ellow]greyPinkyOrangePurple) before the www!:

242 Mirror Poems and Reflections by [Latham, Marc]

Spring Equinox International Day of Happiness and mistYmuse End Eve

The northern hemisphere spring equinox is today, at about 1600/1700 in the U.K., so it’s quite easy to celebrate the International Day of Happiness. However, it must be harder for people in the southern hemisphere, with today marking the beginning of autumn, and the end of the warmer months.

March equinox illustration

Happiness is Relative

There are a lot of people who find it difficult to be happy in the northern hemisphere too, and that’s where things like society and culture make a difference. Iceland is one of the ‘happiest’ countries despite being one of the coldest.

That’s mostly why I set up the mistYmuse (Midwinter Ideal Sunrise Times and Midwinter Until Spring Equinox) to bring some happiness to the most difficult months, covering November to March.

I could have been saying it was timed right this year (although not the day, as it falls on the 20th this year, rather than 21st, as it sometimes does), with a mini-freeze just ending in time for today, but I just saw another one is forecast for the Easter weekend in a couple of weeks. At least there’s more light than darkness now, with more chance of warming sun when it’s shining through the cloud.

Happy Guilt

U.K. comedy great Ken Dodd passed away recently, and one of his regular topics and subject of a song was happiness. I was thinking then that I would probably be happier if I focused on entertainment, instead of feeling obliged to write about the negatives of the world, mostly due to having been to university and studying politics and international communications, and wanting to ‘make a difference’; knowing I can only try and slow the planet’s decline down, due to human overpopulation and consumption; which brings me into direct conflict with the general theme of global human happiness… in the short term anyway… as future generations will be happier if they have a cleaner planet with lots of other species!

Stephen Hawking, who of course inspired the greenYgrey parody comedy science correspondent, Stephen Wolfing, also passed away recently. He seemed happy, having fought against the most debilitating illness, showing there are different ways to find happiness, and sometimes adversity provides the opportunity for personal greatness… as in Buddhist enlightenment or Nietzsche’s superness, which can provide happiness whatever the situation.

Comedy Philosophy

Anyway, I have become too greenYgrey, and will leave you with some Ken Dodd happiness to enjoy the special day, in whatever way, wherever you are. In the obituaries I was also reminded of Dodd’s 1960s (my birth decade) Knotty Ash Diddy Men, which could have been an early influence on my greenYgrey fantasy fiction, although I didn’t remember them at the time!:

Wikipedia: The Diddy Men have a song, once released as a single, titled “The Song of the Diddy Men”, sung in a high pitched, chipmunk style voice. It includes the chorus: “We are the Diddy Men, Doddy’s dotty Diddy Men, We are the Diddy Men who come from Knotty Ash”. Another song “Doddy’s Diddy Party” featured the refrain – “tonight’s the night the Diddy Men paint the town, we’ll lose our blues, and let our Diddy hair down”. There were several other songs including Diddycombe Fair – a spoof of the well-known West Country song Widecombe Fair.

Don’t Cry for Me Scandinavia

Don’t cry for me Scandinavia
The truth is, your countries are colder (on average)

Just a little self-parody comedy to start this blog; a cover-version of:

Don’t cry for me, Argentina
The truth is, I never left you
Read more: Madonna – Don’t Cry For Me Argentina Lyrics | MetroLyrics

Y-Dawn Day Beer/n and Gone

January 21st has passed, so we are now in the muse months of the greenYgrey world’s aid to psychologically surviving the winter; I know it won’t keep you warm or full, but that’s the government’s job.

The four months of mistYmuse were mostly conceived to pass the hardest months of the year for those who don’t like winter (such as S.A.D sufferers), so mostly Y-Dawn Day marks the end of perhaps the toughest part, and the later lighter days show that winter is nearing its end, and spring isn’t far away.

It happened to coincide with my last day in Iceland, so I celebrated with three pints of Gull in Reykjavik (my fourth and fifth of the year), spending the last of my coins, apart from a small one kept as a memento; continuing what is now a thirty-one-years-old tradition!:

IMG_20180121_182124

Iceland’s Excellent Parody/Satire Humour

I think I can write freely with parody and satire about Scandinavia because I know they have a fantastic tradition of free press and speech, mirroring being top of the gender and social equality league tables nearly all the time.

I also saw evidence of such funny comedy in the Reykjavik Grapevine, English language newspaper. While I don’t consider it as cleverly subtle as mine, its obviousness probably gets the message across to the casual reader more. English is of course not Icelanders’ first language either; something their generally excellent skills and willingness to talk it makes you forget; which makes it all the more impressive.

Here’s an example from the RG, part of an obviously OTT (Over The Top) round-up of Icelandic footballers playing in Europe, showing a jovial attitude to religion in a country that still respects and reveres their pagan traditions:

‘After Albert Gudmundsson was absurdly shown red in a Jong PSV match against Fortuna Sittard for an alleged beating motion that never happened, he sought the aid of Tyr, Norse God of law and justice, trusting in him to resolve the situation. After Tyr familiarised the Dutch disciplinary committee with the proverb, “Fear the reckoning of those you have wronged,” they immediately reversed the referee’s three-match punishment, terrified that an uncontrollable rage was building within Albert’s psyche.’

If you like such comedy, XaW Files is full of it, as were Werewolf of Oz and Greenygrey’s Rambles:

 

Is P the New G? New Chav and Toff Single… FSOL or Chas and Dave?

greenYgreyologist cultural anthropologists have been wondering for a while if P is the new G in the greenygrey world. It started when greenYgrey merged with PinkyOrangePurple at the end of XaW Files, becoming gYgPoP, with P drawing level with G at two inclusions. The growth of PoPadom has increased this year with the parodymeter becoming the best techno innovation of the century; this blog post scoring highly.

This new greenYgreyology paradigm shift theory bucks the trend of acronyms and abbreviations by expanding the P being the new G equation to Papua New Guinea. The country of that name has no other connection to the greenYgrey world. It is thought to have narrowly edged out Alpha Papa as the favoured term; a 2013 Alan Partridge film.

Future Sound of London Remixes Past

With absolute disregard for the above, Chav and Toff are releasing their second cover-version single, allaying their fans’ fears that they had split, after Toff was seen flirting with Jacob Rees-Mogg on This Morning; apologising for calling him a s*x god!

Fans of dance music might think it is Future Sound of London’s Papua New Guinea, putting two and two together from the above.

But in line with Toff’s recent behaviour we’re staying on the Chas and Dave theme with Rabbit.

All the above is parody comedy wordplay of course, using real events and culture as props. I don’t consider Toff a pest, and haven’t even seen any of her reality TV or presenting appearances.

 

Result of Jesus Wordplay: Je Suis = 100% Sun = 40%

The BBC (David Icke’s devil-worshipping paedophiles?) announced more religion and a broader scope from now on this morning, which judging from the last twenty years of Multicultural Fascism means much more Islam; it’s a numbers game you see, and now that there are a higher percentage of Muslims after twenty years of pandering to their religion and their high birth rate, despite their prophet marrying a 6-year-old and consummating it when she was 9, the BBC will have the excuse to escalate the Islamisation of dear ol’ Blighty even more.

That’s why I will never like or support Islam. I can tolerate a benign Islam, as religion was all becoming benign in Blighty until Tony Blair stirred things up with his religious focus in the New Labour years.

If we’re going to have more religion on the BBC, which means almost certainly more Islam, I think the ‘prophet’s’ personal life should be included all the time, to give it context, rather than leave it as it usually is now: some kind of benign mystical benevolent new revolutionary charity!

Jesus was a Good Historical Figure and Example

There are a lot of people in my demographic who rebel against Jesus, some even going over to the other side: the counterculture kind of devil worship. I think that’s mostly rebellion against hypocritical institutions; Australia has just reported on years of abuse by the (mostly Catholic) Church, schools and sports teams, and Blighty is supposed to be doing the same, justifying my and others like me’s rebellion in the 1980s, although it just seems to be being replaced by a foreign (Islam) version now for another generation; but there are some who may cross over into the traditional stereotype of older establishment Icke-criticising devil worship (seems to be more of it in ‘heavy metal’ now).

I liked Jesus as a rebellious anti-materialist carer, but don’t think he was as special as Christians make out; I think he was just a special person in his time and place, like many people throughout history, all over the world. If the Romans hadn’t brought Christianity back to Europe then Jesus would probably just have been a local hero. Ironically, the Romans went downhill after adopting Christianity, with their empire ending soon after. The same as Egypt when Islam took over from the original monotheist god: the sun.

Not that I think religion should be judged on military success. Sun worship didn’t save the native Americans when the Europeans arrived.

Title Explained: greenYgrey-style Wordplay

There are some people who still think I’m too chavimbo (chav himbo-bimbo) to be the wordplay genius who wrote Werewolf of Oz and XaW Files in a decade-long greenYgrey concept after becoming a doctor of philosophy, and who ran multiple marathons after travelling around the world on a shoestring.

I would list my many flaws, but think I’ll let the double-negatives do some work for themselves, although I have previously written in the mental health genre; it’s not easy being greenygrey!

I liked the Jesus story (when I watched The Last Temptation of Christ recently I wondered if The Pretty Reckless’s devil-worshipping Taylor Momsen was my last temptation?), and thought recently with my focus on the sky about his time on the cross.

Jesus and the Sun

Who did Jesus apparently talk to in his last time on Earth, nailed to the cross after being taunted and tortured by humanity: the sun in the sky.

Moreover, Jesus shares two of his name letters with the sun: the s and u. The 40% of the title. They are in the right order too, and with room at the end for an N to complete sun, instead of the second s.

That would make the name Jesun, sounding like the French Je suis: I am; I sun. However, Je Suis is also Jesus with an extra I: the anagram I Jesus.

Jesus’s Biblical end, on the cross with the sun, could be interpreted as being represented by the Ancient Egyptian Ankh symbol/hieroglyph, which preceded Christ and Christianity by over a thousand years, as David Icke has pointed out similar on stage, in videos previously posted on this site.

The ankh, during the reign of Hatshepsut (1508–1458 BC), from the Royal Ontario Museum

The symbol was later used by Coptic Christians, who have suffered several attacks by Islamists in Egypt in recent times, in an attempt to wipe them out, although some moderate Muslims have supported them.

This representation reminds me of pre-Abrahamic monotheism’s ancient respect for nature, across a world that was not supposed to be connected, as seen in religious symbols from South America and the Middle-East. There were similar beliefs across the rest of the world, in what is now called Australasia.