Tag Archives: life

Midwinter Most Ideal Sunrise Times Month

I was thinking of updating the mistYmuse today, as it’s over two weeks in now (started November 21st, a month before midwinter) and there are only two weeks until the Winter Solstice, when it will be midwinter in the northern hemisphere. The MIST of mistYmuse stands for Most Ideal Sunrise Time, and now that we are only a fortnight away from December 21st we are in the best four weeks for seeing the sunrise as late as possible, and it is now in the 8-9am hour in Blighty.

Advent Calendarists joined the December party on the 1st of course, and have to wait another four days for their biggest day on the 25th.

I’ve been seeing in the news that lots of people have thankfully been up popping POP (PinkyOrangePurple) pictures, such as this classic one featured on the BBC:

Inkberrow in Worcestershire

I just wrote a blog post on this site’s sister site, fmpoetry, with an update about the POPolution.

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Thanksgiving UK: MIST and mistYmuse Eve Days

As the USA prepares to celebrate Thanksgiving, and break up the time between Halloween (Samhain) and Christmas (Midwinter), it’s time once again for greenYgreyliens and POPolutionaries to party like its spring/summer again in the U.K. and northern hemisphere: MIST and mistYmuse (combining MIST [Most Ideal Sunrise Times, November 21st – January 21st] and MUSE [Midwinter Until Spring Equinox, January 21st – March 21st] eves.

The more serious side is that it hopefully helps people who don’t like the winter, such as SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) sufferers survive the harsher weather and reduced sunlight of the next four months. I noticed Iceland has a similar strategy when I visited in January, as they keep their winter decorations up until spring!

The positive side to this time of year for me is that sunrises are later in the morning (8-9am, instead of the early hours in midsummer), and there isn’t too long until the sunset twilight time; only about seven or eight hours later.

New Pagan Festival

It’s one of the newest pagan festivals in the human world, but not the only one, and open to non-pagans too of course. The sky is for everybody.

Last year when I was in the USA my visit coincided with the summer Manhattanhenge, when New Yorkers celebrate the best day of the year for the sunset and sunrise lining up between the skyscrapers, as the stone henge builders of prehistoric times built their great structures to receive the light at special times of the year: solstices (December and June) and equinoxes (March and September) around the 21st of the month. I didn’t know about if before, and saw it in the media. It’s also on Wikipedia.

In the UK, Milton Keynes was built with that in mind, I found out after looking up Manhattenhenge on Wikipedia above.

POP if You Want To

As I believe the sky is for everybody, I also think it’s up to you what you see or want to see there. I’ve been pushing POP (PinkyOrangePurple) as the more normal colour combination to the traditional red (pre-POPularised by the red sky at night and red sky in the morning proverbs), but sometimes there is only one or two colours, and there is rare red. So if you see red you see red, and don’t feel under any obligation to POP all the time.

Last week I was lucky to see a pretty good POP sunset. Here’s some photos:

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I wrote about twilight times a lot in XaW Files, when I first noticed the POP (PinkyOrangePurple) dominant colours, sometimes writing at this time of the year. I think it would make a great Winter Solstice Christmas present.

Finland Leaf Heart

I was thinking of my time in Finland recently… three times.

First was when I was writing about photosynthesis, and thought of this photo taken in a Helsinki park:

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Second was writing about how I’d wanted New Labour to follow the Scandinavian example twenty years ago on the fmpoetry blog.

The third was reading that Finland is the safest country in the world according to the World Economic Forum. Iceland was third and Norway ninth. The UK was down in 78th, even below the USA I think of as a bad example; maybe it’s the other way around?

Wolfsburg Make it a Long Way to Akureyri

Another week, another apology to Akureyri. After a triple apology last week, following Wolfsburg Women’s 1-0 win there, with the winner scored by my player of the century, Pernille Harder; and suggesting they adopt the It’s a Long Way to Tipperary song, after neither the greenYgrey or me reached there, I saw that Wolfsburg finished off the job with a 2-0 win in Wolfsburg, with Harder getting the first. Wolfsburg were of course stars of my last fantasy fiction travel quest trilogy, XaW Files: Beyond Humanity.

Respectful Admiration and Parody Comedy, greenYgrey style

To show this is mostly parody comedy, I didn’t even know it was a two-leg tie, or I would have suggested the second leg as a great time to introduce their version of the famous war song.

However, in true greenYgrey style, just because I’m writing it as parody comedy doesn’t mean I don’t take women’s football seriously, or am insincere in my respect and admiration for Pernille Harder and the rest of the Wolfsburg team, or their Akureyri Thor opponents.

There was a mixture of skilful football and hard tackling in the game. Harder took her headed goal coolly well, and curling shots and intricate back-flicks were my highlights from the highlights on YouTube:

I would have loved to have been there, but haven’t received an invite!

 

Sunnymoon is Over, Honeysunny Time in Loch Lomond

The sunnymoon period was over the next day, visiting Loch Lomond, but it was dry, and atmospheric. As in Norway where the narrow fjords with steep mountains are the most spectacular, I think lochs such as nearby Loch Long and Loch Awe are more picturesque in places, but Lomond is nice too, with several islands, and a visible mountain line dividing the Highlands and Lowlands going through it. As the biggest freshwater body in Britain at about twenty-four miles by five, it also has been-there-and-done-that value.

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No O Ban in Oban

As we headed farther north-west, I thought we might face questions about our human-star mixed relationship, but I was relieved to see there was no O ban in Oban, and my beloved star was able to shine as brightly as possible in the lovely coastal town facing the island of Mull across the Firth of Lorn.

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Sunnymoon Full Moon Coincidence

I didn’t know it was a Full Moon yesterday when I wrote of going on a honeymoon with the sun, calling it a sunnymoon. The first I knew of the Full Moon was when I saw it shining very brightly; with its shine a reflection of the sun.

Seeing the orca in the Clyde made me think they look like aquatic pandas, and could be derived from a common ancestor called a pandorca: originally from Majorca.

Sunny Inverary

We continued our sunnymoon in historic Argyll and Bute Loch Fyne (also a restaurant chain!) fine sunny Inverary.

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Viking Pagans Were of their Time, Monotheists Worse in More Recent Times

If I.S. have done one good thing for humanity and the world it is to show the horrors of war; of course, they weren’t meaning to do good for humanity and the world. As Simon Schama pointed out at the start of the Civilisations programme with the account of the killing of Khaled al-Asaad, 82, at Palmyra, for refusing to reveal the whereabouts of art pieces, they were doing it to intimidate and threaten, using new information technology.

Art of the Vikings

My interest in Viking culture (500-1100 AD) was inspired by The Vikings movie (1958), and when I was young it was all about their scenic sailing warriordom; as I was intrigued by wild pagan Native American horseriding culture from Hollywood movies.

However, in modern times; I intended starting my travels by taking the ferry to Bergen, Norway, but then changed them as I waited for the Monsters of Rock in late August, and so headed south straightaway, before reaching there for the Midnight Sun Marathon in 2007; I admire Scandinavia for its democratic civilised qualities and environmental initiatives.

In the latest NASA’s Unexplained Files I liked the story of the skydiver seeing a rock fall near him, causing a year-long search. When a NASA worker worked out it must have fallen from his parachute, the Norwegian investigator said he thought everybody would be angry, but they were all happy and congratulatory, because they’d been honest, and science had worked. That’s the kind of scientific ethos I try to have with my writing and research.

In Secret Knowledge: The Art of Vikings I liked the jadeYgrey Buddha statue they found some Vikings had from the 6th Century Swat Valley in the heart of Asia, which was then Buddhist (about 14 minutes of the documentary).

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Then just after about 20 minutes of the 30 minutes documentary, Dr. Ramirez says she thinks one of the main interests the pagan Vikings first saw in the Christian religion was the part played by fish, as they were a part of their natural folklore too, and they valued living things the most. This thirty-five piece gold, silver and bronze (me: Olympic medals relevance?) Viking fishtail necklace shows their respect:

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Vikings in Historical Context Compared to Monotheism

Inquisition Documentary Shows Christian Horrors

The Yesterday channel series about the Inquisition has showed the horrors of the Christian church in Europe from the 11th Century to the 19th, with the last episode focusing on the British witch trials. Thousands of people were killed, with most being women who were the community healers; or victims of grudges and land grabs. Britain wasn’t as bad as continental Europe, and one man called Matthew Hopkins killed the majority of victims in a three years period 1644-1647.

Muslim Pirates Acting Like Vikings Until 19th Century

Barbary pirates were raiding Europe as the Vikings had done up to the 19th Century, capturing victims for sale as slaves, until European nations united to repel them. Over a million Europeans were enslaved from 1530 to 1780. Some of the enslavers were European ‘converts’.

When I was reading about Iceland around my January visit I saw that it suffered horrific such attacks in 1627, with hundreds of victims killed, and hundreds forced into slavery. (Wikipedia).

Conclusion

I’ve grown out of my childhood and youthful Romantic Viking Hollywood movie inspiration now, and relate more to Odin than Loki of the Valhalla pantheon; wisdom over trickery; especially after seeing the Valhalla Rising film featured heavily in the Scandinavian section of XaW Files!

As Dr. Ramirez pointed out at the end of her Art of the Vikings documentary, the battles for ‘England’ in 1066 were basically a Viking civil war, with the Normans (Norsemen) Vikings who settled in northern France, and those already resident in ‘England’ having strong Viking links after hundreds of years of residency.

I updated my thoughts on the Americas migration, and its connection to the Middle-East, last night on fmpoetry.wordpress.com, arguing that what is most amazing about it is that the Mayans featured similar structures and symbols (500-800 AD) about 20,000 years after their ancestors must have left the Middle-East to start the migration to the Americas, and where the Mesopotamians would signify the importance of the bag-carrying Apkallu around 2500 BC.

I just posted a long article updating my alien space wonder wanderings on this site’s sister site fmpoetry, including more on the Mesopotamian Apkallu featured on this site before. Along the way I found this artist’s interpretation of how ancient humans used to gYgPOP (greenY[ellow]greyPinkyOrangePurple) before the www!:

242 Mirror Poems and Reflections by [Latham, Marc]

Iceland Travel History Article Published

An article I wrote about my January trip to Iceland has been published on travelthruhistory. In the article I remember my original Beat inspiration, going against the grain by stressing the journey experience, and I think being innovative by including what I’d have liked to have done or seen but missed; partly as consolation to the good people who think I do and have done too much, and have it too easy. Stating I thought I was mostly lucky counters those who think and hope the opposite for me. Here’s some more photos from my time in Reykjavik:

Laugarnes Park (first afternoon/evening)

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Tjornin (the Pond) (next morning)

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Viking Statues (and Hallsgrimskirkja church) (afternoon)

new non-human friend reminded me of a special old one

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Loki the Pearl (Loki café and Perlan)

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http://www.travelthruhistory.com/html/exotic120.html