Tag Archives: The Buried Giant

Derren Brown Fans, This May Be 2 Much Information: Prepare your Conscious Minds for Amazing Unconscious Revelations… and Sunrise Research!

Spelling it out clearly for you, in case you think I’m causing trouble for negative reasons: I want humanity to see beyond cultures that promote unnecessary cruelty, whether against other humans or animals; and unnecessarily close minds and experience.

greenYgreyliens in the northern hemisphere who suffer from SAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder), and lamenting the end of hot sunny days, will no doubt be looking forward to the greenYgrey world MIST months start on November 21st. Only the greatest greenYgreylien greenYgreyologists will remember what the MIST acronym stands for; and they will be better greenYgreylien greenYgreyologists than me, as I first of all remembered it as Most Ideal Sunrise Time, when the M in fact stands for Midwinter in my proposal posted on the greenYgrey3 website on Valentine’s Day this year.

Kazuo Ishiguro’s Clouds and Mist Delayed Reaction

After writing that I consider monotheism to be clouds of culture over the last couple of blogs, obscuring the clear sky reality of more ancient holistic knowledge, last night I connected it with this year’s Nobel prize-winning Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant, which I’ve been reading lately. That takes place in a dark ages Britain cloaked in a mysterious fog that the protagonists think has made them lose their memory.

Like with Patti Smith’s M Nights, I didn’t think it was as good as my XaW Files (sorry Patti and Kazuo), but I am biased! As the expert reviewers opine, and I realise now after my delayed reaction, it does have a haunting narrative that sticks to you after finishing it.

Connecting Stormy Seas and Monotheistic Clouds

I also connected my British negative immigration policy Stormy Seas (rather than the Calm Reservoir I think we need) with the Monotheistic Clouds keeping the masses from seeing what’s really going on.

The Stormy Seas mean the masses always stay under the surface, gasping for air, and not having enough time to see what’s going on above the waves – and when they do, they only see Monotheistic Clouds rather than clear sky.

I thought it was quite nicely summed up by this photo, a National Geographic Wildlife Photos competition candidate, seen on MSN News, that I first of all thought of posting as an example of a POP (PinkyOrangePurple) sky, but then thought it was quite representative of how I see the masses’ situation in Blighty and the world – struggling for survival under the surface, with clouds of censorship (especially monotheism, but also other religions, or people cults in communism etc) above.

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POP Research

Talking of POP skies, I saw this MSN News story about sunrises last night. It has twelve slides of sunrise photos, and I can only see one that has what I’d call red in it, and that’s a thin line amongst the pinky orange above the purplish cloud in slide 3:

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Maybe the reason I can’t remember seeing red in the sunrise is because I’ve mostly only been studying them for the last decade, and in the city, as explained under slide 11: ‘Dust and pollutants found within the atmosphere’s boundary layer absorb and filter visible wavelengths of light. So, the vibrant oranges and reds of “clean” sunrises become diluted to pale yellows and baby pinks.’

I prefer pink to red anyway! However, I still think red is rare in sunrises, as shown in this spectacular twilight time photo from somewhere, featured on the greenYgrey3 website nearly a year ago, which might look red to inexperienced twilight colours researchers on first look, but when you look closely, it is most definitely POP (PinkyOrangePurple). It is just a screenshot image now rather than the video:

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These are the photos I based my research on, showing the beauty of Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, Blighty, preserved online in Google Photos and YouTube videos. Thanks to the local people for their tolerance. These are playable videos:

Kazuo Ishiguro Nobel Prize Literature Mistake Agreement Parody

Kazuo Ishiguro won the Nobel Prize for Literature yesterday, and humbly said he thought it was a mistake.
I thought it was a mistake too, as I was sure it was my year!

Image result for kazuo ishiguro images

Self-Parody Explanation

I thought about including this explanation before, or a self-parody warning, but thought I’d tell the joke first, as it would otherwise spoil it. I didn’t really think I was in with a chance of winning it… but do think I’m capable of deserving it, even if I don’t now.

I made that point in XaW Files (8:15), when adding to Richard Flanagan’s thoughts on how writing empties you in an Imagine documentary, after he’d won the Man Booker Prize; he’d said there was no why, there just was:

Moreover, I have also felt the same as Flanagan: that each book written and published, or even poem or philosophical thought, diminishes you.
With the benefit of time, I think the reason I think that is that the writer is sharing themselves with the world, so that their thoughts and experiences are not all theirs anymore; your mind life is scattered all over the pages and world. This can be good and bad for your psyche and soul, hypothetically, releasing negativity and sharing positivity.
Our books from life experience are also material evidence of time elapsed. We can write a limited amount from personal experience in our finite time. Each book tells the story of a part of our lives that has passed. It has been lived and written.
In childhood and youth we look forward, with our minds and lives to fill with experiences, knowledge and memories. Writing about them is evidence that some have been found and achieved. However, it also shows that your life is not as full as it once was. You have already lived some of your life, and the hard evidence is on your written page; unavoidable evidence that your time in this life has diminished.’

Funnily enough, a quote featured in the FundsForWriters newsletter this week has a similar theme:
Only to the extent that we expose ourselves over and over to annihilation can that which is indestructible be found in us.
~American Tibetan Buddhist nun and teacher Pema Chödrön

Parody and Satire Critical Theory High Cost Writing

I think critical writing can be the most costly, and especially self-analysis, self-parody and self-satire; as I try to do, in part so I think I am justified in criticising, parodying and satirising others.

I thought about writing freely that I thought there was a second mistake when they said Kazuo Ishiguro is an Englishman, but now only write it as an example of how I think it is beyond the political correctness line.

Japanese and Jewish (I’m not Either! – self-parody exclamation!!)

As the U.K. left make the ‘racist’ mistake of thinking they can say what they want about Jewish people (not that I’m Jewish!) because they are stereotypically whitish and westernish, the Japanese might seem similarly open to ‘free’ parody, but I know differently.

I know that my parody probably makes it even more unlikely that I won’t win any awards, or get a big publishing deal, but I continue to do it, because it’s what I want to write, and would rather write freely and poorly than censored and richly.

Mainly because I just wanted to, but also to show that I’m not bitter or jealous, except for self-parody comedy reasons seen above, I’ve started reading Ishiguro’s The Buried Giant book. It’s not his most famous work, but it was available, and sounds interesting with a British pagan history timeframe, and a protagonist called Axl (Axl Rose being the lead singer of Guns N’ Roses, the band I named my first book after!).

The Guns N’ Roses Worker-Traveller, XaW Files: Beyond Humanity and my other great coffilosophical (not the first coffilosopher, but the first to name myself such, as far as I know) books are available on Amazon: